Business Analyst CV: Example and How to Write

One problem with being a business analyst in the middle of a job search is that it’s a role that can look wildly different from company to company, let alone industry to industry. BAs work across and between business functions and in industries like financial services, IT, and education.

 

Unless you’re staying within a very well-defined niche, you’re likely to be met with recruiters who aren’t at all sure what you do or—worse still—think they know exactly what you do. The world of business analysis can be complex, technical, and jargon-filled.

 

Your task then becomes to logically organise and clearly and persuasively present complex, technical, and jargon-filled data to a varied audience. Luckily, this is at its core what a BA does. This guide is here to help you bring your skills to bear on something that might be standing in the way of your success – your business analyst CV.

 

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Business analyst CV sample

 

Edward Parkin

Phone: 077 7854 3524

Email: ed.r.parkin@mailee.co.uk

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/edwardparkin_rz

 

Qualified and experienced business analyst with a background in ESB. Demonstrably experienced in both Waterfall and Agile project management frameworks throughout the product development cycle as well as change implementation (internal and external). Proven track record of reducing resolution times for critical use requests (by 23% on average). Seeking further professional challenges and growth when it comes to analysis and reporting and especially consultation and implementation.

 

Work experience

 

Business Analyst

Avemarena Consulting, Leeds

June 2017 – present

  • Critically evaluated information gathered from multiple sources and decomposed high-level information in order to distinguish and prioritise user requests, decreasing resolution times for critical requests by 23% on average.
  • Effectively negotiated issue ownership with two key IT suppliers, resulting in 68% of all incoming application support requests being routed to these suppliers by default and 57% of these being resolved at the front line.
  • Assessed change readiness in one org unit to be insufficient and delayed a change deliverable by 1 week, post-hoc analysis showed that this resulted in an overall saving of 3 weeks.
  • 100% of undertaken projects (over 75 measurable outputs and deliverables) accepted by company as falling within the defined frameworks.

 

ESB Junior Business Analyst

Hexacrow, Manchester

February 2015 – May 2017

  • Aligned clients’ requirements with the capabilities of the ESB platform to broaden the range of solutions bought by clients by 10% on average.
  • Assisted in the development of a proposed system design using the ESB platform in accordance with the Agile development methodology.
  • Ensured that issues were identified, tracked, reported on and resolved in a timely manner, reducing average time-to-resolution from 11 to just over 9 days.
  • Assisted in the enforcement of project deadlines and schedules, keeping critical-path delays down to zero on three major projects by being proactive in monitoring progress through data analysis.

 

Education 

 

BA (Hons) Business Management with Analytics (2:1), 2011 – 2014

Leeds Beckett University, Leeds

(Including one-year placement with Hexacrow)

 

Skills

 

  • Verbal (oral and written) communication skills: liaised between third party vendors and subject matter experts on often sensitive change projects whilst regularly reporting back to executives and managers.
  • Analytical and problem-solving skills: redrafted KPIs to find that some ongoing issues had only been artefacts of KPI selection while others had gone undetected under previous KPI regime.
  • Ability to work in a fast-moving environment with rapidly evolving targets: over 5 years experience in various flavours of Agile PM, including Kanban and Scrum.
  • Influencing and facilitation skills: lead three particularly sensitive change projects that required stakeholders with opposing interests to cooperate.
  • Decision-making skills: saved a net 2 weeks critical path time on a project by deciding to delay a key stage in order to boost change-readiness, this decision was made with incomplete and complex data and had to be approved by the Board.

 

Additional certification

 

  • Professional Certificate in Agile Business Analysis, 2014
  • BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, 2018

 

Software

 

  • TFS
  • Jira
  • Azure DevOps Server
  • ARIS
  • Visio

 

Languages

 

  • German – upper intermediate

 

Now you know what to include in a BA CV. Here’s how to write your own CV:

 

1. Write a personal statement for your BA CV

 

The first thing in your CV, after your personal details, should be your personal statement. Also known as a personal profile, your personal statement is a direct answer to the questions on every recruiter’s mind: who is this person and what can they bring to my company?

 

Literally just answering those questions is a perfect way to write your personal statement. There’s just one more question you should add to round out the statement. All up, you should aim to answer the following in about 50-150 words—3-4 sentences in total:

 

  1. Who are you?
  2. What skills, experience, and attributes can you bring to the company?
  3. What are your goals, how would this job fit in with your professional aims?

 

You should write a new personal statement for every job application. Use your personal statement to show that you’re a perfect match for the job on offer.

 

This section goes first, but it’s best to write it last. It’ll be much easier once you have a master list of skills and a full employment history in front of you (that's why it's also known as a CV summary). It’s important to have it in the back your mind from the beginning, though.

 

One last thing to look out for: when choosing relevant skills for your business analysis CV personal statement, use the same keywords as those in the job advert. Many companies will use an Applicant Tracking System (ATS) to sort CVs by relevance and recruiters will also be scanning for relevant keywords.

 

A personal statement for a business analyst CV

 

Qualified and experienced business analyst with a background in ESB. Demonstrably experienced in both Waterfall and Agile project management frameworks throughout the product development cycle as well as change implementation (internal and external). Proven track record of reducing resolution times for critical use requests (by 23% on average). Seeking further professional challenges and growth when it comes to analysis and reporting and especially consultation and implementation.

 

A strong CV summary will convince the recruiter you’re the perfect candidate. Save time and choose a ready-made personal statement written by career experts and adjust it to your needs in the LiveCareer CV builder.

 

Create your CV nowcv builder

 

2. Rework your work experience section

 

Tackle this section first. Writing your work history won’t be the easiest part of writing your BA CV, but it will bring you the greatest ROI. Don’t omit this section, even if you’re writing an entry-level business analyst CV. If you have no work experience at all, then consider writing a student or graduate CV instead.

 

Stick to a chronological CV format. Start with your most recent experience and work your way back from there. This is by far the most common format, it’s what recruiters and hiring managers are used to seeing. It’s also what ATSs are designed to parse most easily.

 

Although Curriculum Vitae stands for 'course of life', include only relevant work experience. Don’t just list your duties. Give concrete examples of your competencies. Quantify your achievements and impacts as much as possible. Don’t try to put a spin on things, let the facts speak for themselves. Aim for up to six bullet points.

 

Start each bullet point with an action word, like assessed, ensured, achieved, or negotiated. Consider using the SAR (Situation, Action, Result) framework. It’ll make the process much easier. Try to use accomplishment statements rather than responsibility statements.

 

Job descriptions for an IT business analyst CV

 

Business Analyst

Avemarena Consulting, Leeds

June 2017 – present

  • Critically evaluated information gathered from multiple sources and decomposed high-level information in order distinguish and prioritise user requests, decreasing resolution times for critical requests by 23% on average.
  • Effectively negotiated issue ownership with two key IT suppliers, resulting in 68% of all incoming application support requests being routed to these suppliers by default and 57% of these being resolved at the front line.
  • Assessed change readiness in one org unit to be insufficient and delayed a change deliverable by 1 week, post-hoc analysis showed that this resulted in an overall saving of 3 weeks.
  • 100% of undertaken projects (over 75 measurable outputs and deliverables) accepted by company as falling within the defined frameworks.

 

ESB Junior Business Analyst

Hexacrow, Manchester

February 2015 – May 2017

  • Aligned clients’ requirements with the capabilities of the ESB platform to broaden the range of solutions bought by clients by 10% on average.
  • Assisted in the development of a proposed system design using the ESB platform in accordance with the Agile development methodology.
  • Ensured that issues were identified, tracked, reported on and resolved in a timely manner, reducing average time-to-resolution from 11 to just over 9 days.
  • Assisted in the enforcement of project deadlines and schedules, keeping critical-path delays down to zero on three major projects by being proactive in monitoring progress through data analysis.

 

3. Don’t overlook your education section

 

This is the easiest section, but attention to detail is no less important here than elsewhere. Once again, use a chronological format, work from most to least recent. Follow the business analyst CV template to keep the layout clear.

 

If you have BCS/ISEB certification (or equivalent) or the BCS International Diploma in Business Analysis, then you can include it here or in an additional section.

 

There’s usually no need to mention secondary school once you’ve got your university degree. If you’re writing an entry-level or junior business analyst CV, then you may consider adding your A-levels and GCSEs. Still at university? Then include your expected graduation date.

 

For university degrees, include the university name, the name of your degree, and the years attended. If you are going to include your high school education, then include the name of the school, its location, and the years you attended.

 

List all three A-level subjects but just include the number of GCSEs you completed without listing them individually. It’s often a good idea to mention Mathematics and English in your GCSEs, though, as many employers will be on the lookout for these as a minimum.

 

If you’re a recent graduate or school-leaver and don’t have much experience, then place this section ahead of your work experience section. You can also list some extras here such as extracurricular activities.

 

Education section for a senior business analyst CV

 

BA (Hons) Business Management with Analytics (2:1), 2011– 2014

Leeds Beckett University, Leeds

(Including one-year placement with Hexacrow in Manchester)

 

4. Add a skills section to your business analyst CV

 

Being a business analyst requires a complex set of skills. Not all of these skills will be obvious or even readily understandable by the first person who picks up your CV. Analysis, monitoring, prediction, these things are suggested by the job title, but there’s so much more to it than that.

 

You’ll be tailoring this section to each job offer. Begin with a master list of skills from which you’ll be able to draw for each application. Include hard (technical) and soft skills. It can be hard at first but don’t worry—it snowballs once you get going.

 

Bring up the job advert to which you’re responding. Check what skills they list there. Compare your list with theirs. Identify the matches and choose 5-10 of them for your business analyst CV. Try to keep a good balance between hard, soft, and IT skills—they’re all important.

 

Now, don’t just make a list of skills. Anyone can come up with a list of vaguely-defined but impressive-sounding BA skills. Stand out by adding one sentence to each skill that shows how you demonstrate that skill in action. Once again, be concrete and be specific. 

 

Business analyst skills for a CV

 

  • Verbal (oral and written) communication skills: liaised between third party vendors and subject matter experts on often sensitive change projects whilst regularly reporting back to executives and managers.
  • Analytical and problem-solving skills: redrafted KPIs to find that some ongoing issues had only been artefacts of KPI selection while others had gone undetected under previous KPI regime.
  • Ability to work in a fast-moving environment with rapidly evolving targets: over 5 years experience in various flavours of Agile PM, including Kanban and Scrum.
  • Influencing and facilitation skills: lead three particularly sensitive change projects that required stakeholders with opposing interests to cooperate.
  • Decision-making skills: saved a net 2 weeks critical path time on a project by deciding to delay a key stage in order to boost change-readiness, this decision was made with incomplete and complex data and had to be approved by the Board.

 

5. Consider including additional sections in your BA CV

 

You have all the basics covered: work experience, education, skills. You’ll soon have your personal statement sorted. The problem is that everyone has those sections. Yours will be better than most, and that’ll help, but you don’t want to pass up an opportunity to stand out wherever you can.

 

Add extra sections to your CV to really personalise your application. The other sections will capture 90% of who you are as an employee. Fill out the other 10% for a fuller picture. You could mention additional qualifications, achievements, awards, even hobbies (avoid listing references on your CV, it's old fashioned). Just keep it relevant to your job.

 

Do you have any IIBA certificates? What about PMI or BCS qualifications? An extra section that showcases just these additional certifications is a great way to grab a recruiter’s attention. Treat them similarly to university degrees: include the name of the qualification/certificate, the year/s attended, and the name of the awarding body.

 

Additional sections for an Agile business analyst CV

 

Additional certification

 

  • Professional Certificate in Agile Business Analysis, 2014
  • BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, 2018

 

Software

 

  • TFS
  • Jira
  • Azure DevOps Server
  • ARIS
  • Visio

 

6. Write a business analyst cover letter to go with your CV

 

As a BA you appreciate the significance of proper documentation better than most. A cover letter remains one of those formalities that you shouldn’t forego lightly. Include a cover letter with your business analyst CV unless you’ve been specifically asked not to.

 

It’s no secret that formal cover letters (actual letters) are going the way of the hand-drawn Gantt chart, but just over half of employers still prefer candidates to include a cover letter. You have everything to gain by including a cover letter and nothing to lose.

 

Start by using the right cover letter format. Once you have the formalities out of the way, grab your reader’s attention with a strong opening—lead with an impressive professional achievement. Showcase your skills and experience as a BA. Close your cover letter with a call to action: an opportunity to discuss your candidature further.

 

7. What else should you keep in mind when writing a BA CV?

 

Business analysts are very familiar with the importance of presentation. By now, you’ve put considerable effort into presenting the information in your business analyst CV as clearly as possible. Look after that investment of time and energy by seeing to aesthetics and optics.

 

Stick to some basic CV layout rules:

  • Make your personal details clear and easy to find—leave them in the header.
  • Organise your BA CV into sections by using clear subheadings.
  • Use a professional-looking CV font and be sure to use white space to your advantage.
  • Send your CV as a PDF file unless specifically asked for another file type.
  • What about CV length? One page should be enough for junior BAs, while those with more than 5 years of experience under their belt can go for two pages.
  • If you're planning to use a free CV template found online, make sure it is ATS-friendly.

 

Proofread—check for spelling and grammar mistakes and make sure both your CV and cover letter are clear and easy to read. Ask someone else to read and check through them as well. Make use of any of the apps, web apps, or programmes out there that can help you with spelling and grammar. It’s incredibly important that you have everything word-perfect.

 

One last CV tip: you should definitely avoid using ‘Please find attached my CV.’ when sending in your job application. 'I’ve included my CV below." sounds more like the XXI century.

 

Congratulations, now you know what a CV should look like. You’ve dramatically improved your chances for success!

 

You don’t have to be a CV writing expert. In the LiveCareer CV builder you’ll find ready-made content for every industry and position, which you can then add with a single click.

 

Create your CV nowcv builder

 

Has this guide been helpful to you? Do you have any questions on how to write a BA CV? Please leave me a comment below if you do! These are interesting and challenging times to be a business analyst—I hope this article helps you get the job you’ve always wanted.

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LiveCareer Editorial Team

LiveCareer Editorial Team

About the author

Since 2005, the LiveCareer Team has been helping job seekers advance their careers. In our in-depth guides, we share insider tips and the most effective CV and cover letter writing techniques so that you can beat recruiters in the hiring game and land your next job fast. Also, make sure to check out our state-of-the-art CV and cover letter builder—professional, intuitive, and fully in line with modern HR standards. Trusted by 10 million users worldwide.

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